• UCL Twitter account
  • UCL YouTube channel
  • UCL Facebook page
  • UCL SoundCloud channel
  • UCL iTunes store

Information for Staff

Calendar

Select dates to view past and future events

Lunch Hour Lectures

Lunch Hour Lectures are an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at UCL, in bite sized chunks. Speakers are drawn from across the university, and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications.

Lunch Hour Lectures take place 13:15 - 13:55, are free, require no pre-booking, and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

All lectures are streamed live online and can be watched by clicking on the Watch Lunch Hour Lectures online link above. Lectures can also be watched from one week after the event on our YouTube channel where all lectures will be subtitled. Alternatively, lectures can also be downloaded from iTunes U and from SoundCloud.

The lectures take a break over the summer, but watch this space for more information about our Autumn programme, or follow us on twitter for the most up to date news: @ucllhl

Tuesday 9 February 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: Why do we give? Charity-giving through an evolutionary lens

13:15  — 13:55

In this talk, Dr Nichola Raihani will discuss how individuals might themsleves benefit from making charitable donations and how our psychology might trick us into believing that we…

Mimesis_anthropology

Thursday 11 February 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: The illusion of infinity: is there a limit to optical fibre bandwidth?

13:15  — 13:55

The development of the optical fibre communication network has sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the internet. Is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre…

image

Tuesday 23 February 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: From gases to gloops: instabilities in fluids

13:15  — 13:55

Fluid flows make up so much of our world, from the atmosphere and oceans to volcanic lava. They are also key to many biological processes, and almost everything we use goes through…

image

Thursday 25 February 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: childhood maltreatment through the lens of neuroscience and epigenetics

13:15  — 13:55

Childhood maltreatment is a strong predictor of mental and physical ill health. How does such adversity 'get under the skin'? Latent vulnerability is one way of thinking about how maltreatment…

image

Tuesday 1 March 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: 'This should be fun!': consent, sex and wronging

13:15  — 13:55

Join Professor Veronique Munoz-Darde as she explores the moral significance of consent in general, of consent to sex in particular and what should count as non-consensual bodily invasion.

image

Thursday 3 March 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: Still lives: death, desire and the portrait of the Old Master

13:15  — 13:55

Michelangelo was one of the biggest international artists of his time, but being Michelangelo was not easy: he was stalked by fans, lauded and lambasted by critics and depicted in unauthorised…

image

Tuesday 8 March 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: reproduction without sex: what does technology have to offer?

13:15  — 13:55

The first IVF baby was born in 1978. Since then, technology has advanced so that IVF success rates are higher than natural conception, and it is now possible to check the chromosomes…

image

Thursday 10 March 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: Ovarian cancer screening: the long journey

13:15  — 13:55

Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Professor Usha Menon speaks about her group's 30- years journey and one of the largest randomised…

image

Tuesday 15 March 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: On the origins of life: a chemist's perspective

13:15  — 13:55

Over the past 150 years, great advances have been made to elucidate the molecular basics of evolution and the evolutionary trajectory of life, but the origins of life remain a mystery.…

image

Thursday 17 March 2016

Lunch Hour Lectures: Bones, mummies, tuberculosis and ancient DNA

13:15  — 13:55

Tuberculosis is an ancient disease and is still with us today. Historical DNA tells us that 'modern' tuberculosis existed 9,000 years ago, and the fact that its different strains are…

image