• UCL Twitter account
  • UCL YouTube channel
  • UCL Facebook page
  • UCL SoundCloud channel
  • UCL iTunes store

Information for Staff

Calendar

Select dates to view past and future events

18:15 - 19:30 20 September 2016

Understanding the Arctic September 2016 sea ice minimum

Location

G22 LT | Pearson Building (link Map)
Gower Street | London | WC1E 6BT | United Kingdom

Open to: Academic | Alumni | Public | Student
Admission: Free
Ticketing: Pre-booking essential

Speaker information

Mark Brandon, Reader in Polar Oceanography, Open University
Julienne Stroeve, Professor of Polar Observation & Modelling, University College London
Ed Blockley, Head of the Polar Climate Group, Met Office Hadley Centre
Chris Rapley, Professor of Climate Science, University College London
Andrew Shepherd, Professor of Earth Observation at the University of Leeds, Director of the NERC Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling

The Arctic has undergone some of the most rapid transformations over the past 50 years, with global implications for the Earth’s climate. A dramatic indicator of Arctic climate change is the shrinking summer sea ice extent (SIE) and Arctic is now expected to become ice-free during summer at some point this century.

This year, expectations for a record sea ice minimum were high following an unusually warm winter Arctic. While forecasts in June and July predicted a below average but not extreme summer minimum it now seems that the unusually warm August over the Arctic could result in the September SIE being the second lowest to date.

Our event will take place only a few days after the September SIE minimum and we will take this opportunity to ask five scientists to reflect on the conditions that lead to the sea ice summer conditions in 2016 as well as the implications of a rapidly declining Arctic sea ice cover beyond the Arctic region and in the context of long term climate change.


Contact

Michel Tsamados
+44 (0)20 7679 3017 | m.tsamados@ucl.ac.uk


Links

Challenger Society Sea Ice Group
Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM)
Department of Earth Sciences


image