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13:15 - 13:55 24 November 2011

Lunch Hour Lecture: Did democracy cause the American Civil War?

Location

Darwin Lecture Theatre - accessed vial Malet Place | Darwin Building (link Map)
access via Malet Place | London | WC1E 6BT | United Kingdom

Open to: Academic | Alumni | Public | Student
Admission: Free and open to anyone on a first-come first-served basis. Lectures are also streamed live online or can be downloaded after the event.
Ticketing: Open

Speaker information

Dr Adam Smith, UCL History

A hundred and fifty years ago the first shots of the American Civil War were fired. It was a war that was to result in the deaths of perhaps three quarters of a million people. Yet the United States in 1861 was the world's first modern democratic nation - a place in which virtually all white men could vote and in which mass political parties vied for votes in noisy and hotly contested elections. What was the relationship between the coming of the war and this kind of democratic politics? Contrary to the assumptions of International Relations specialists who have posited that democracies do not go to war with one another, was this a war made more likely, and, once it started, more bloody, by the principles and practice of popular sovereignty?

This lecture marks 2011 as 150 year anniversary of American Civil War


Contact

Dan Martin
020 3108 3840 | dan.martin@ucl.ac.uk


Links

Click here to watch this lecture streamed live online at 1.15pm on the day


American Civil War